If You Liked The Hunger Games: Sci-Fi Thrillers

The Diary of Pelly D, by L.J. Adlington. Y Adlington.
When Toni V, a construction worker on a futuristic colony, finds the diary of a teenage girl whose life has been turned upside-down by holocaust-like events, he begins to question his own beliefs.

Candor, by Pam Bachorz. Y Bachorz.
Oscar Banks is the son of the founder of Candor, FL, a town where the teenagers are controlled by subliminal messages. Unlike all other teens, he knows about the Messages and fights them with his own counterprogramming and secretly gets kids out of Candor, while pretending to be the model of perfection. When Nia moves to town, he is smitten by her tart attitude and ability to see through his perfect-boy front. He can’t stand to see her changed by Messages, and has to decide whether to help her escape and lose her or keep her close and risk discovery.

Exodus, by Julie Bertagna (Sequel: Zenith). Y Bertagna.
In the year 2100, as the island of Wing is about to be covered by water, fifteen-year-old Mara discovers the existence of New World sky cities that are safe from the storms and rising waters, and convinces her people to travel to one of these cities in order to save themselves.

The Roar, by Emma Clayton. Y Clayton.
In an overpopulated world where all signs of nature have been obliterated and a wall has been erected to keep out plague-ridden animals, twelve-year-old Mika refuses to believe that his twin sister was killed after being abducted, and continues to search for her in spite of the dangers he faces in doing so.

The Maze Runner, by James Dashner . Y Dashner.
Sixteen-year-old Thomas wakes up with no memory in the middle of a maze and realizes he must work with the community in which he finds himself if he is to escape.

The Sky Inside, by Clare Dunkel. Y Dunkel.
Martin lives in a “perfect world” under the protective dome of suburb HM1, where every year a new generation of genetically-engineered children is shipped out to meet their parents. And it’s all about to come crashing down because a stranger has come to take away all the little children, including Martin’s sister, Cassie, and no one wants to talk about where they have gone. Martin has a choice either to remain in the dubious safety of HM1, or to break out of the suburb into the mysterious land outside.

Incarceron, by Catherine Fisher. Y Fisher.
To free herself from an upcoming arranged marriage, Claudia, the daughter of the Warden of Incarceron, a futuristic prison with a mind of its own, decides to help a young prisoner escape.

Gone, by Michael Grant (Sequels: Hunger; Lies). Y Grant.
In a small town on the coast of California, everyone over the age of fourteen suddenly disappears, setting up a battle between the remaining town residents and the students from a local private school, as well as those who have “The Power” and are able to perform supernatural feats and those who do not.

Among the Hidden, by Margaret Peterson Haddix (Sequels: Among the…). YPB Haddix.
In a future where the Population Police enforce the law limiting a family to only two children, Luke has lived all his twelve years in isolation and fear on his family’s farm, until another “third” convinces him that the government is wrong.

Girl in the Arena, by Lise Haines. Y Haines.
In Massachusetts, eighteen-year-old Lyn, who has grown up in the public eye as the daughter of seven gladiators, wants nothing less than to follow her mother’s path, but her only way of avoiding marriage to the warrior who killed her last stepfather may be to face him in the arena.

Epic, by Conner Kostick. Y Kostick.
On New Earth, a world based on a video role-playing game, fourteen-year-old Erik pursuades his friends to aid him in some unusual gambits in order to save Erik’s father from exile and safeguard the futures of each of their families.

The Declaration, by Gemma Malley (Sequel: The Resistance). Y Malley.
In 2140 England, where drugs enable people to live forever and children are illegal, teenaged Anna, an obedient “Surplus” training to become a house servant, discovers that her birth parents are trying to find her.

The Returners, by Gemma Malley. Y Malley.
Will Hodges wonders why “freaks” began following him after his mother drowned, but when he finally discovers what they want, he can begin to make sense of the nightmares he has always had and try to do something about the anti-immigrant hatred that his father so vehemently espouses.

Daylight Runner, by Oisin McGann. Y McGann.
In the domed city of Ash Harbor, as sixteen-year-old Solomon Wheat and his friend Cleo seek Sol’s missing father, they face great danger both from humans and failures of the city itself.

The Knife of Never Letting Go, by Patrick Ness (Sequels: The Ask and the Answer; Monsters of Men). Y Ness.
Todd Hewitt is the only boy in a town of men. Ever since the settlers were infected with the Noise germ, Todd can hear everything the men think, and they hear everything he thinks. Todd is just a month away from becoming a man, but in the midst of the cacophony, he knows that the town is hiding something from him — something so awful Todd is forced to flee with only his dog, whose simple, loyal voice he hears too. With hostile men from the town in pursuit, the two stumble upon a strange and eerily silent creature: a girl. Who is she? Why wasn’t she killed by the germ like all the females on New World? (Publisher Marketing)

Life as We Knew It, Susan Pfeffer. Y Pfeffer.
Through journal entries sixteen-year-old Miranda describes her family’s struggle to survive after a meteor hits the moon, causing worldwide tsunamis, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions.

Fever Crumb, by Philip Reeve. Y Reeve.
Foundling Fever Crumb has been raised as an engineer although females in the future London, England, are not believed capable of rational thought, but at age fourteen she leaves her sheltered world and begins to learn startling truths about her past while facing danger in the present.

Lockdown: Escape from Furnace, by Alexander Gordon Smith. Y Smith.
When fourteen-year-old Alex is framed for murder, he becomes an inmate in the Furnace Penitentiary, where brutal inmates and sadistic guards reign, boys who disappear in the middle of the night sometimes return weirdly altered, and escape might just be possible.

Inside Out, Maria Snyder. YPB Snyder.
“…I’m Trella. I’m a scrub. A nobody. One of thousands who work the lower levels, keeping inside clean for the Uppers. I’ve got one friend, do my job, and try to avoid the Pop Cops. So what if I occasionally use the pipes to sneak around the Upper levels. The only neck at risk is my own…until I accidentally start a rebellion and become the go-to-girl to lead a revolution”–Cover, P.[4].

Truesight, by David Stahler, Jr. (Sequels: The Seer; Otherspace). Y Stahler.
In a distant frontier world, thirteen-year-old Jacob is uncertain of his future in a community that considers blindness a virtue and “Seers” as aberrations.

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